5 LESSONS FROM A FAILED CHALLENGE

This challenge has taught me more than I’ve set out to learn.

1. I know that I could sit down and pound out words when push comes to shove.

There’s no doubt about that.

What surprised me was the effect of doing so. I found that I wasn’t focused on creating great work. I was more focused on fulfilling a quota and making sure that I completed the challenge.

2. Creating content for the sake of creating content isn’t a good fuel source for creating meaningful content.

For me, creating content is an end to the means, not a means to an end.

There needs to be a bigger reason for me to create the content other than just creating it. A great treasure map leads you to treasure, but if there’s no treasure to reach, all you have is a detailed map that no one cares about.

3. When time is the most valuable commodity, fast failure is the better than prolonged failure.

Don’t be afraid to quit a challenge and pivot.

The quicker you fail at something, the quicker you can learn your lessons and recalibrate your approach. A better way to attempt this personal development blog would be to keep attempting challenges until I find my real strengths and motivations. Learning about how to create personal challenges is a big part of what I want to document.

4. Learning about yourself is tough when you’re protecting an ego that you aren’t entitled to.

Suck it up bitch.

It’s tough to tell yourself that you aren’t as great as you may think, or as great as others may think. This is a personal development blog and all the good shit happens when you allow yourself to personally develop. The best content that could be made is content that’s authentic with your struggle. Use that fucking struggle to document the reality of how hard it is to grow in a world that doesn’t need you.

5. Chances are, someone else has already figured out your problem, and you’re just stubborn. When in doubt, read and reach out.

I’m incredibly stubborn.

I hate admitting it, but more often than not, I’ve always found relief in asking for help when I really don’t want it. Sometimes I just need to take a step back and understand my situation from another point of view.

I’ve found that I can get closure to my frustrations if I just accept and convey my shortcomings to those involved. Usually, this allows me to make the first steps that I need so that I could continue to move forward.

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